Documenta: Public Programs, November 23–30, 2016

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Wednesday November 23, 2016
The Noospheric Society
The Making of Brotherhood/Sisterhood and Tantra Rising
With Mihalis Filinis and Angelo Plessas
7–9 pm, Athens Municipality Art Center, Parko Eleftherias
The third meeting of the Noospheric Society at Parko Elefterias is titled The Making of Brotherhood/ Sisterhood and Tantra Rising. During this session artist Angelo Plessas presents the latest edition of the Eternal Internet Brotherhood/Sisterhood, a project curated by the artist that hosts different guests every year. In October 2016 the project took place in the historic Sigiriya area in Sri Lanka. For the second and largest part of the session the artist invites meditator Mihalis Filinis to teach the Noospheric tantric massage. This session includes different techniques with elements spanning yoga, bioenergetics, and light sexual therapy.
The Noospheric Society is a communal society conceived by Angelo Plessas for people to rest in contemplation, in an altar of digital detox. It is a therapy session, a spiritual situation which attempts to explore our bodies and minds as well as a social environment surrounded by ideas and particles aiming to float freely in space and time. The Society illuminates issues of spirituality, cultural heterogeneity, cosmic life, and education in the open air. The Noospheric Society is the preparation for the development of the Eternal Internet Brotherhood/Sisterhood.

Please bring a yoga mat with you for the session.

Mihalis Filinis is a yoga instructor and a meditator. Filinis lives and works in Athens.

Angelo Plessas is an artist. The focus of his work is networking the offline with the online in ways that help us understand both conditions. His activities range from performances to artist residencies; from self-publishing to interactive websites; from sculptures to live-stream events and educational projects. Plessas lives and works in Athens.

November 24, 25, and 26, 2016
The Society for the End of Necropolitics
Wars and Capital
Three-day seminar
With Eric Alliez and Maurizio Lazzarato
7–10 pm respectively, Athens Municipality Art Center, Parko Eleftherias
This three-day seminar reexamines the fundamental relationships that wars and civil wars (among classes, races, sexes) have entertained with capital (and especially financial capital) throughout the history of capitalism. The financialization of the turn of the 20th century spurred two total wars, interrupted by the 1929 stock market crash and the civil wars within Europe. A century later, contemporary financialization is rushing us into the polarizations of the civil wars of the “ultimodernity.” The 2008 financial “crisis” heralded an era of subjectivized civil wars. This seminar studies these wars in view of Karl Marx’s notion of “primitive accumulation” as economic, political, and subjective conditions of capital. They are the strategic axes upon which the establishment of contemporary war machines resides. One of the aims of this seminar is to better understand the recent elections in the USA and other events in which the American Dream turned into the nightmare of an insomniac planet. The “new fascisms scenario” analyzed by Eric Alliez and Maurizio Lazzarato pitches its camp on the turf of civil wars. It expressly designates the foreigner, the immigrant, the refugee, the Muslim, as the enemy both from within and without, all the while asserting the “naturalness” of heterosexuality, a power dispositif that has been seriously weakened since the 1960s. “Race” does not limit itself to defining the enemy; indeed, along with patriarchy and heterosexuality, it constitutes the terrain for fascist and identity subjectivation.

The seminar will be held in French with simultaneous translations into Greek and English.

Eric Alliez is professor at the Université de Paris 8 and at the Centre for Research for Modern European Philosophy, Kingston University, London. His latest book is Défaire l’image. De l’art contemporain, in collaboration with Jean-Claude Bonne (Undoing the Image. On Contemporary Art, 2013). He lives and works in Paris.

Maurizio Lazzarato is a sociologist and philosopher. His latest books are Marcel Duchamp et le refus du travail (Marcel Duchamp and the Refusal of Work, 2014), and Gouverner par la dette (Governing by Debt, 2014). He lives and works in Paris.

Eric Alliez and Maurizio Lazzarato jointly published Guerres et Capital (Wars and Capital, 2016).

Wednesday November 30, 2016
The Apatride Society of the Political Others
Indigenous Knowledge 1:
On Violent Waters. A Discussion on Borders and Migration
Talk, audio, and film forum
With Dimitris Parsanoglou, Maria Iorio, and Raphaël Cuomo
Coordinated by Max Jorge Hinderer Cruz, Nelli Kambouri, and Margarita Tsomou
7–10:30 pm, Athens Municipality Art Center, Parko Eleftherias
In contemporary discussions of European borders, the sea stands as a silent and invisible yet violent medium that accentuates the tragic or heroic border crossings of migrants and refugees. Although it cannot be grasped, the sea becomes a dynamic environment that responds to the violent assaults of border crossings and surveillance technologies. Three different narratives are conflated during this event in order to explore the different kinds of knowledge of the techno-natural echoes of violence in Mediterranean borderline waters and shores.

Breaking the Waves: The Excess of Mobility During the Long Summer of Migration
Talk by Dimitris Parsanoglou
7–8:30 pm

Sudeuropa
Maria Iorio and Raphaël Cuomo
Film screening and discussion
9–10:30 pm
Sudeuropa (2005–07) opens with shots of cliffs filmed from the sky, taken from a TV program about regional folklore and broadcast on the Italian Canale 5 Mediaset. A female voice reports the words of the host of the program. They boast of the beautiful panorama, the Mediterranean Sea, the wonderful landscape, and the holiday pleasures available on the Italian island Lampedusa, the southern limit of Italian territory. Later we understand that these images of the coastline also attest to the surveillance of this territory. Filmed in close collaboration with the authorities, they trace the regular patrol routes of military and police helicopters which secure the Italian border and prevent any uncontrolled arrival of people who left Tunisian and Libyan shores with the aim of reaching Europe by boat.

Dimitris Parsanoglou is a sociologist of migration. His work focuses on transnational labor markets and urban spaces, migrant domestic work, digital media, and border crossings. He lives and works in Athens.

Maria Iorio and Raphaël Cuomo are an artist duo based in Geneva and Berlin. Their collaborative artistic practice involves long-term research on the economies of visibility in relation to past and present mobility regimes over the southern and northern shores of the Mediterranean Sea.

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Φωτογραφία/Image Credits:
Bonita Ely, Sewing Machine Gun, 2015, site-specific installation of Interior Decoration, Palimpsest Biennale, Mildura, Australia, 2015 / Bonita Ely, Sewing Machine Gun (2015), εγκατάσταση ειδικά σχεδιασμένη για το Interior Decoration, Palimpsest Biennale, Mildura, Australia, 2015
Maria Iorio and Raphaël Cuomo, Sudeuropa, 2005-2007, video still

Θεσμικός Υποστηρικτής / Cohosting documenta 14 in Athens:

Athens School of Fine Arts
Πληροφορίες / Information
presse@documenta.de

documenta 14 στο Πάρκο Ελευθερίας
Κέντρο Τεχνών Δήμου Αθηναίων
Λεωφόρος Βασιλίσσης Σοφίας
11521 Αθήνα
Μετρό: Μέγαρο Μουσικής
T +30 210 724 8150

Από 1η Οκτωβρίου ανοικτά Τρίτη-Σάββατο, 5-10 μ.μ.
Ελεύθερη είσοδος

documenta 14 at Parko Eleftherias
Athens Municipality Arts Center
Leoforos Vasilissis Sofias
GR-11521 Athens
T +30 210 724 8150

From October 1: open Tuesday to Saturday, 5–10 pm
Free admission

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