Experts, Expertise, and Eastern Europe A Symposium | Wed, Dec 2, 12:30-2:00

The last Eastern Europe workshop of the semester will take place this Wednesday (December 2), a symposium on “Experts, Expertise, and Eastern Europe,” with George Giannakopoulos and Malgosia Mazurek, introduced by Larry Wolff

from 12.30 to 2pm at 285 Mercer St. 7th floor NYC

EURO-UA 190 Role of Experts in the EU (Thursdays, 10:00am—12:00pm, CEMS conference room)
Democratic governance needs the knowledge of experts. And yet, there is a tension between democracy and expertise. Democracy is based on the idea that free citizens have the equal right to vote and the equal right to shape public opinion and thereby to influence governance. Expertise in contrast is knowledge that relies on disciplinary practices and builds upon scientific theories, methods, experiments and empirical research. It is argued that especially in the European Union the power of experts is too big and contributes to a growing distance between elites and citizens.
In the first part of the seminar we shall discuss theoretical concepts for analyzing the role of science and expertise in democracies. In the second part of the seminar we shall investigate the role of experts in the European Union. Is there empirical evidence for the critique that experts are too influential in European politics and policies? The examples we shall examine are the management of the Eurozone crisis and environmental policy. In the third part of the seminar we shall discuss proposals for adequately dealing with the irresolvable tension between democracy and expertise in the European Union.


EURO-UA 292 Europe in the 1960s: Youth, Culture, and Politics (Mondays, 10:00am—12:00pm, CEMS conference room)
This course will chart the origins and development of Europe’s student movements in the 1960s. Our analysis will extend to the entire continent of Europe, East and West, and will situate the era’s well-known student activism in the context of larger geopolitical events, such as the Cold War, de-Stalinization, decolonization, and the advent of mass, consumer culture. We will investigate the lasting contributions of the ‘60s generation, while simultaneously dissecting the myths that have developed around “1968.” By including Eastern and Western Europe, the course will suggest that “the sixties” was a continent-wide experience, but that life under socialism vs. life under capitalist democracy impacted Europe’s youth cultures in very different ways. Although we will be attentive to the nuances distinguishing student life on the two sides of the Cold War divide, the course will present the argument that while scholars often treat Eastern and Western Europe as entirely distinct, a more holistic view allows us to see the many historical trends binding the continent together. Beyond understanding the events of the 1960s, a major goal of the course is for students to learn how to think critically about history, and how to analyze historical documents. Class time will be divided between lectures, and discussions and short in-class writing assignments based on primary sources, including films, music, and political writings.

EURO-UA 300 Undergraduate Research Seminar (Wednesdays 10:00 a.m—12:00 p.m, CEMS seminar room)
This course focuses on research methodologies and research design approaches employed in the field of European Studies. During the class we will cover various types of empirical methods, focusing on qualitative ones, such as ethnography, participant observation, interviews, historical research, and will briefly discuss issues related to quantitative ones, such as sampling and data interpretation. We will look at different examples of how these methods can be effectively used and combined for studying different aspects of European societies, EU’s political institutions, and local cultural practices. The course will emphasize the framing of research questions, as well as the choice of best methods for research, and how the choice of methods influences the significance, meaning, and impact of the results. Assignments from this course are designed to help students prepare for and advance their BA thesis projects. They will consist of several small projects, and a larger research project employing an original methodology.

EURO-UA 983 European Political Thought Since Rousseau (Thursdays 10:00 a.m—12:00 p.m, CEMS seminar room)
This course examines the development of political thought in Europe from the second half of the eighteenth century to the start of the twentieth. We will look at the Kantian, Hegelian and Marxist developments in this tradition. We will discuss the important role played by differing conceptions of freedom, human nature, and history, in shaping the political thought of the period. And we will address issues concerning autonomy and authority, the nature of the state, and the limits to state power.

Spring 2015

EURO-UA 173 History of Yugoslavia and Issues of National Conflict in Postwar Europe (Thursdays, 1:00pm—3:00pm, CEMS conference room)
This course examines the history of socialist Yugoslavia, from its inception, up through its collapse in the early 1990s. We will particularly discuss questions of nationality and national conflict, examining the Balkans within the framework of debates about ethnicity, race, and religion held across Europe throughout the postwar period. Was there a particularly “Balkan” character to national conflict in Yugoslavia? Do arguments about ethnicity or race in other parts of Europe give us a new way to address the Balkans? What can Yugoslavia teach us about national diversity in Europe as a whole?

EURO-UA 981 Internship (self-scheduled)
Permission of the department required.

EURO-UA 982 Topics in European Union Studies: the Political System of the EU (Mondays, 10:00am—12:00pm, CEMS conference room)
The European Union is a unique system of governance beyond the nation state. How does this political system work and what are its characteristic features? In this course we will explore the reasons for European integration and investigate why the cooperation of 28 member states does make sense in spite of all the problems that are connected with this experiment in new modes of governance. We will analyze the institutions and selected policies of the European Union. Finally we will study the realization of democratic legitimacy in European governance and discuss proposals for a more democratic political system of the European Union.

EURO-UA 998 Independent Study (self-scheduled)
Permission of the department required.

Fall 2014

EURO-UA 300 Undergraduate Research Seminar (Wednesdays 9:30 a.m—12:00 p.m, CEMS seminar room)
This course focuses on research methodologies and research design approaches employed in the field of European Studies. During the class we will cover various types of empirical methods, focusing on qualitative ones, such as ethnography, participant observation, interviews, historical research, and will briefly discuss issues related to quantitative ones, such as sampling and data interpretation. We will look at different examples of how these methods can be effectively used and combined for studying different aspects of European societies, EU’s political institutions, and local cultural practices. The course will emphasize the framing of research questions, as well as the choice of best methods for research, and how the choice of methods influences the significance, meaning, and impact of the results. Assignments from this course are designed to help students prepare for and advance their BA thesis projects. They will consist of several small projects, and a larger research project employing an original methodology.

EURO-UA 565 Topics: History of Anthropological Encounter (Tuesdays 2:00 p.m—4:45 p.m, CEMS seminar room)
This colloquium in history aims to trace the European anthropological encounter with other peoples, and especially with indigenous Others, and to situate it in broader movements in European intellectual history since the Renaissance. The historical focus of the course is dual: first, the Enlightenment, when travels and ethnographic encounters defined not only the relations of an ascendant Europe to the rest of the world but also the relations of Europeans to their own political and cultural status. Second, the period 1858-1955 when anthropology came into its own as a discipline and science, and when the study of other peoples.

EURO-UA 983 Eastern Europe in the 20th Century (Thursdays 10:00 a.m—12:00 p.m, CEMS seminar room)
This course will examine the history of Eastern Europe from the eve of World War I through the collapse of the socialist regimes and the end of the Cold War. We will survey the major events of the 20th century, while positioning the region within a global context. Important topics covered in this course include ideas of modernity and backwardness, nationalism and the emergence of nation-states, war, socialism, and the region’s place in the evolving idea of “Europe.” Our discussions will draw on literature, film, and other primary source materials, in addition to academic studies.

EURO-UA 981 Internship (self-scheduled)
Advanced students of European and Mediterranean studies can earn academic credit for a structured and supervised professional work-learn experience within an approved organization.

Graduate-level Courses Open to Advanced Undergraduates with Permission of Instructor
EURO-GA 3905 Topics in European Politics: the Welfare State in Europe and America (Mondays 4:00 p.m—6:00 p.m, CEMS seminar room)
Charitable attempts to help the poor can be found throughout history, but the modern welfare state has sought not just to alleviate poverty but to assure citizens the right to a basic standard of living. It has, moreover, attempted to ensure protection for all citizens, not just the unfortunate, against a broad palette of natural and social risks. And in its most ambitious formulations, it has aimed to redistribute income and moderate economic and social inequalities. The welfare state has thus been an ambitious attempt to intervene in the market and assert society’s control over the economy. Its beginnings in the late 19C, its expansion in the 20C, and its current embattled condition have all therefore been accompanied by intense political controversy. This course will place the welfare state in its broad historical context, examining the radical break it represented, exploring the way in which it has differed among nations and assessing its current condition: victim of its own success or embattled ideal?

EURO-GA 3901 Sincerity and Authenticity in European Thought (Thursdays 2:00 p.m—4:00 p.m., CEMS seminar room)
The course will examine the emergence, in European thought, of the related ideals of sincerity and authenticity. We will investigate the ways in which they have shaped moral and political thought in Europe, particular through their roles in debates about identity, nationalism and multiculturalism. We will do so mainly through an examination of primary texts, ranging from philosophical and political texts to novels and poetry. Alongside these we will also read some of the contemporary literature on the significance of authenticity as an ideal.

EURO-GA 3213 Eastern European Workshop (Wednesdays 12:30 p.m—2:00 p.m (generally twice per month), CEMS seminar room)
The Eastern Europe workshop is an informal 2-credit lunchtime workshop for graduate students and advanced undergraduates meeting together to hear speakers and discuss issues concerning Eastern Europe.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s